A round up of excellent New Zealand art books and editions

Stoic patriotism in the New Zealand art world is a ‘thing’ for good reason. Our artists are topping-the-world-charts exemplars. If your art budget’s on the leaner side, you now have the option of heading straight to the curators of many a great art book and edition via ArtNow.

Yona Lee: In Transit (Arrival)
Te Tuhi is proud to present the publication Yona Lee: In Transit (Arrival). Documenting the elaborate installation In Transit (Arrival) by Auckland-based artist Yona Lee, this limited-edition, bi-lingual (English and Korean) publication features full-page colour images of the work plus writing by Jinsuk Suh, director, Nam June Paik Art Center, Seoul; Bruce E. Phillips, curator at large, Te Tuhi; Jungah Lee, curator, Alternative Space LOOP, Seoul and design by award-winning graphic designer Kalee Jackson.

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Seascape #3 (blue midday), The Gap, Vaucluse, Sydney, Australia by Harry Culy
Harry Culy’s The Gap is an ongoing series of seascapes started in 2014. It presents views of the horizon from Sydney’s South End Beach at various times of day under different weather conditions — fixing the unfixable ‘moods of the sea’. This classic formal exercise took on other dimensions when Culy discovered the dark history of this site as a notorious suicide spot. His seascapes speak to stillness and movement, beauty and horror, life and death — and photography’s capacity to cross these divides.
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Edith Amituanai: Double Take
This publication and the exhibition it accompanies is the first to survey Edith Amituanai’s photographic practice. In images spanning 2003 to the present, Amituanai shares her experiences of life as a first-generation, New Zealand-born Sāmoan, presenting portraits of people and places from her home in Ranui, West Auckland to her homeland of Sāmoa, to the scattered sites of Pacific diaspora from Christchurch, New Zealand to Montpellier, France, and Anchorage, Alaska.

These prove her empathy and engagement, confounding photography’s reputation as an organ of control and objectification. In this volume, Haruhiko Sameshima calls Amituanai a ‘village photographer’. This term aptly captures her commitment to record events and occasions as an embedded chronicler working for her community; it also encompasses the notion that hers is a global village connected by her lens and through her ready embrace of social media. The images brought together speak to the multiple realities that exist both here and across the world that expand our presumptions about who ‘we’ in Aotearoa are and what constitutes ‘home’.

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Aro Valley, 1999 by Karl Maughan
Karl Maughan’s Aro Valley (1999) will feature in the touring exhibition and accompanying publication Criminal Ornamentation, organised by Hayward Gallery at Southbank Centre and Arts Council England.

Curated by celebrated British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare, Criminal Ornamentation will feature works from the Arts Council Collection that explore ornamentation in art.

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Cause and Effect by John Parker
The book surveys Parker’s extraordinary 50-year career of breaking rules and redefining what it means to make pottery in Aotearoa New Zealand with contributors from around the world including internationally renowned writer, Garth Clark, who studied with Parker at the Royal College of Arts in London in 1974 and 1975.

It’s lavishly illustrated with commissioned photographs by Haruhiko Sameshima, designed by Derek Ward and features essays by Jim Barr and Mary Barr, Andrew Clifford, Grace Cochrane and Douglas Lloyd Jenkins.

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Relic from In Transit (Arrival) by Yona Lee
Relic from In Transit (Arrival) by Yona Lee was conceived by the artist and Te Tuhi as a memento of her highly acclaimed (an above mentioned) In Transit (Arrival) installation commissioned by Te Tuhi in association with Auckland Arts Festival.

The fragment consists of a bus buzzer mounted on stainless steel tube, which evokes the large scale installation presented at Te Tuhi’s foyer. The artist has created a bespoke box to contain the distinctive component.

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+1 310 951 9459 by Fiona Connor
The essays in this book address a number of vital, recurring concerns in Fiona Connor’s sculptural practice: the social life and psychological life of the object, the politics of camouflage and mimesis, and the ethics and aesthetics of the built environment. Crucially, this volume also works the folds of that practice, to give visibility to the artist’s collaborative activities and productive affiliations.

The cover of this book is a gesture symptomatic of Connor’s approach; it is both oblique and intimate, and it demands we pay a different kind of attention to what is in front of us. It also signals a fascination with reproduction and documentation as a tactic to disrupt the processes of perception, and to bring things closer. The photograph is a portrait of Alex North, a photographer, a friend of Fiona’s, taken by his mother, also a photographer. The title of the book is a phone number belonging to another of the artist’s friends and collaborators; one of the designers of this publication. It is placed under the artist’s own name, the direct dial of a colleague who is also an author of this project.

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Untitled by Dane Mitchell
Mitchell is interested in how different forms of knowledge can intersect across the visible and the invisible and, together with Artspace Aotearoa, has created a print edition and a sculptural edition. The sculptural edition is made of perfume, photographic paper, perspex and G-clamps.

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Observations of a Rural Nurse by Sara McIntyre
Sara McIntyre, the daughter of the artist Peter McIntyre, was nine years old when her family first came to Kākahi, in the King Country, in 1960. The family has been linked to Kākahi ever since. On the family car trips of her childhood, McIntyre got used to her father’s frequent stops for subject matter for painting. Fifty years on, when she moved to Kākahi to work as a district nurse, she began to do the same on her rounds, as a photographer.

This book brings together her remarkable photographic exploration — her ‘observations’ — of Kākahi and the sparsely populated surrounding King Country towns of Manunui, Ōhura, Ōngarue, Piriaka, Ōwhango and Taumarunui.

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Umbrella by Sriwhana Spong
Sriwhana Spong is an artist of New Zealand and Indonesian descent currently living and working in London. She is interested in the fertile margins and the rich edges where things meet, working across various mediums such as sculpture, film, writing, performance, dance, and sound.

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